Peer supervision can be used to add value to the expert-apprentice model. This approach can occur with a group of self-voting peers as part of a CBT training course to explore areas of learning in addition to more formal monitoring agreements. The New Zealand Coaching and Mentoring Centre (2012) has developed a peer supervision process, where the supervisor selects one of the peer supervision tools to meet their supervisory needs. (These tools include structured approaches to studying results, questions of ideas, checking work that didn`t go well, checking difficult incidents, and «sampling» upcoming events.) The moderator of the group ensures compliance with the chosen tool and the schedule. The function of the tools is to allow peers to reconcile support and challenge, and also to offer a framework that reinforces critical thinking through the exchange of several perspectives. The overt neglect of surveillance in the literature is not only a topic for CBT. Bernard & Goodyear (reference Bernard and Goodyear2014) find that the development of supervisors has been much less attentive than those who receive it. This poses a problem for superiors who wish to organize their professional development as well as possible, as well as for those who are responsible for the mission and organization of supervision. Moreover, in a professional climate favouring empirically supported interventions, this situation is not sustainable (Milne & James, reference Milne and James2002). They are also committed to our standards of clinical practice, clinical oversight and continuing professional education. Accredited members are audited to ensure that they continue to meet these expectations. To contribute to expertise in CBT supervision, Corrie & Lane (Reference Corrie and Lane2015) have developed a framework – the PURE Supervision Flower – to help supervisors navigate the different tasks, processes and skills of CBT supervision and assess their skills in relation to themselves (see fig. 1).

• What are the possibilities for «supervisory supervision», so that supervisors and supervisory stakeholders can ensure their quality? Answers to members` questions regarding surveillance during the Lanes coronavirus outbreak (Reference Lane, Bashkirova, Jackson and Clutterbuck2011) The identification of these four types of supervision provides an additional lens for CBT supervisors to meet their professional development needs. Understanding the different formats in which supervision can be carried out and received allows us to reflect on the different forms of knowledge, skills and competences that may be particularly important for each of the species practiced. (1) Understand and describe the impact of the context on the CBT surveillance they offer. • supervisor rating scale (SES); Corrie &Worrell, reference Corrie and Worrell2012). This is also influenced by Dreyfus` taxonomy and assesses a supervisor`s competence in a given supervisory session, assessing performance in the four areas (a) session structure and scheduling, b) facilitating supervisors` learning, c) developing CBT-specific skills, and (d) session management. By broadening our understanding of the supervisor as a «one-for-one mentoring character» and viewing supervision as a means of promoting a culture of knowledge, new avenues of approach to higher education development may emerge. . . .